Public Demonstration of Koicha

1
0

I have done many public tea demonstrations over the years (Urasenke style) and all of them have been of usucha. Is there an official Urasenke stance on public demonstrations of koicha?  Would it be acceptable to demonstrate koicha?  Why or why not?   If you have demo’d, how did it go?

  • You must to post comments
3
0

I’ve heard that the Warsaw group likes to demonstrate chanoyu sometimes by doing a shichijishiki exercise called shaza, which includes the making of koicha (along with laying of charcoal, appreciation of incense, arranging of flowers, and making of usucha for the teishu, giving observers an idea of the breadth of activities that chanoyu includes). In these cases no members of the public participate as guests.

Indeed, while Urasenke does not necessarily frown on public demonstrations that include koicha, so far as I know, including members of the public as guests in drinking the koicha would be logistically difficult. Koicha guests need to be able to drink an appropriate amount of tea, clean the rim of the tea bowl, and pass the bowl on to the next guest briskly. In my experience, members of the public drink tea much more slowly than tea practitioners, and I’d worry that they may find the thick texture of koicha challenging and possibly off-putting on top of that.

  • rhondarolf
    Thank you! I should clarify, I almost always have chajin be the guest during our demonstrations of the temae. Sometimes we will serve the public AFTER the demonstration, and I always serve them usucha for several reasons, but especially because it is more palatable to first timers.
  • You must to post comments
2
0

It is alright to do koicha demonstration, the difficulty lies in drinking koicha for the lay public.

  • Elmar
    If you make the koicha for one person, or at most for 2 to share, it is easier. It only gets difficult if you want 3-5 people to share the same bowl, and in that case, you can make it somewhat thinner than usual.
  • You must to post comments
0
0

I enjoyed reading the answers to this. I have a prejudice against doing “demonstrations” and usually try to served tea in as close to an authentic tea ceremony as possible given the circumstances. Always this has been usucha for the obvious reasons involving the drinking of koicha by groups of non-students. A couple of times I have served koicha but that involved extra preparation of the “guests”.

Listening to the above answers it occurs to me that as koicha is the “real” tea ceremony perhaps demonstrating it would be a better idea in some circumstances. I get the uncomfortable feeling that many now associate usucha with chanoyu and have the wrong idea about its place. Thanks for bring this up.

  • You must to post comments
Showing 3 results
Your Answer

Please first to submit.