Satsûbako

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Dear all,

I have a question regarding the natsume for Satsubako. I’ve been taught only in Konnichian liaison offices where the dôgu comes from the Sôke – so the set is the ‘standard’ one, with the black lacquer natsume – but I was wondering if that’s a rule or that’s just the practice. I’ve tried to read some of the text books but the answer was nowhere to be found.

Thanks in advance

Best,

Fukuda

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My notes say that it should indeed be a black shin-nuri natsume. Now that I look at my notes they actually say that it should be a shin-nuri chuunatsume, but everywhere I go I have used ko-natsume.

Satsubako is considered one of the secret teachings in Urasenke, and they have strongly encouraged people to not make written instructions for those. That might be why you have been unable to find more specific information about it.

  • Admin Admin
    This was moved from a post to a comment by Admin: Thanks, Marius, the chunatsume fits better the ootsubukuro, no? or do you use tsutsumi bukusa? that’s true…I had forgotten they don’t publish above shikaden text books…but even on the internet that people post videos, blogs with real high okuden otemaes information I could not find anything. Maybe with the old otemaes coming back like usucha kazari otemaes, the Soke is bending some of the rules heheh thanks again, Fukuda
  • Marius Frøisland
    You can do the temae with either otsubukuro or tsutsumi bukusa. In both cases I feel it fits better with a small natsume than with a normal sized one.
  • Elmar
    I would like to know why these temae are “secret” – is it just to preserve the financial aspect of paying for the lessons to learn it?
  • Marius Frøisland
    This is a good question, that I believe deservs it’s own post, not just a comment ;)
  • Adam Sōmu
    I’d be interested in a forum on the relevance of ‘secret’ teachings now!
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As an Omotesenke student I can not “answer” but I might be able to add some comments. The Otsubukuro is an Urasenke invention. In Omotesenke a chu or ko shinnuri natsume is placed in a shifuku. It seems strange to me to do tsutsumi bukusa temae because I have only learned this where that fukusa is used for temae which would require two fukusa since the other chaire is used first. But then, why not? 🙂
Certainly it is hard enough to tie a fukusa around a ko natsume. 🙁
As for the secret temae and licenses in general…
I value the contribution of the Iemoto’s to the preservation and development of the art therefore I contribute to this system.
Everyone practices tea for different reasons which would automatically change there relevance.
Obviously someone interested in tea as a Zen practice will find these less useful than someone interested in following the Urasenke way of tea for example.

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Omotesenke uses two chaire for satsûbako.

Historically, there were more variations at Urasenke. At the time of Gengensai, it was possible to use two tsutsumi bukusa for satsûbako. During the time of Tantansai, it became usual to use a chaire and an otsubukuro for satsûbako. When it comes to choosing between konatsume and chunatsume, shall we take into consideration the shape of the chaire so that the pair looks harmonious ?

  • JOHN LEON LARISSOU
    Usually in Omotesenke we use a ceramic chaire and a natsume and two shifuku. If Urasenke used two tsutsumi bukusa, does that mean they used two natsume? Interesting. By the way, men and women handle the natsume differently in Omotesenke when using it for koicha.
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